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TRASH by Andy Mulligan (Meagan & Eva’s Middle Grade Bookshelf)

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TRASH by Andy Mulligan (Meagan & Eva’s Middle Grade Bookshelf)

TRASH by Andy Mulligan

Published by Ember (Penguin Random House), October 2011

Suggested age range:  12 and up

 

SUMMARY:

In an unnamed Third World country, in the not-so-distant future, three “dumpsite boys” make a living picking through the mountains of garbage on the outskirts of a large city.

One unlucky-lucky day, Raphael finds something very special and very mysterious. So mysterious that he decides to keep it, even when the city police offer a handsome reward for its return. That decision brings with it terrifying consequences, and soon the dumpsite boys must use all of their cunning and courage to stay ahead of their pursuers. It’s up to Raphael, Gardo, and Rat—boys who have no education, no parents, no homes, and no money—to solve the mystery and right a terrible wrong.

-courtesy of Amazon

 

IMPORTANT TOPICS AND THEMES:  extreme poverty, greed, corruption, police brutality, justice

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For more Meagan & Eva’s Middle Grade Bookshelf discussions, go here!

 

So what did we think?  

Eva: I LOVED the setting of this book.  I know there are places like this in the world — enormous garbage heaps that children pick through — but I’d never thought about what life would be like there…. or the fact that people actually LIVE there: “The shacks we live in grow up out of the trash piles, bamboo and string, piled upwards — it’s like little villages in amongst the hills.”   The author did a great job of bringing the setting to life, with all the disturbing sights and smells (and rats!) that come along with it.  For example:  

It was dead trash underfoot, and it was damp — you were up to your knees.  

Soon we came to one of the old belt-machines, but this one was disused and rotting.  The belt itself had been stripped out, and the wooden panels had been taken.  It was just a huge metal frame, rusting away.  The arm that held the belt pointed up into the sky like a big finger, and now and then kids would climb it and sit in the breeze.    

I think it’s very important for kids to read a book like this; to be aware that places like this exist.  

 

Meagan:  I agree.  We’ve talked before about one of the major functions of literature being to increase your empathy range.  That’s definitely the case with this book.  Even though the characters’ life circumstances would be hard to relate to for lots of kids, the characters themselves aren’t hard to relate to at all.  They are funny and sweet and struggle with things that many kids struggle with (like loyalty to friends and trying to decide the right thing to do in a complex situation), and that makes them relatable, even though their circumstances are much more dire than the average kid’s.  

 

Eva:  I found out about Trash because some of the 7th graders I tutor were assigned it for summer reading.  I’m sure it provides a great jumping off point for class discussions about poverty, class differences, and the environment.  Hopefully those who read it will think twice every time they throw something away!

 

Meagan:  I could definitely see reading this book with a class.  Not only does it have some powerful social issues to discuss, but I think it could be an easy entryway to talking about theme in literature.  The book’s title, Trash, is an overt theme throughout the book and comes up in multiple ways.  There’s all the literal trash the boys pick through and live amongst, but there are also several situations in which human beings are treated like trash or called “trash.”  I think this is a sort of gateway literary theme that almost any middle school kid could pick up on.  They might even be able to make the leap to realizing that the author is using the dumpsite setting to get readers to think about the “trashification” of people.

 

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Eva:  I think many middle school kids will enjoy this book.  It’s fast-paced and written in a simple style.  It contains plenty of action and suspense.  However, as a writer, I wondered if the story as a whole could have been put together in a different way.  

For example, the story is told in turns by the three boys, as well as a few chapters here and there narrated by minor characters — all are in first person.  I’m not sure if it was necessary to give all these characters their own chapters, and there wasn’t always a clear distinction between various voices. Also, the book makes it clear that all of these accounts were written down except for Rat’s (he can’t write so he narrated to someone who wrote it down for him).  I couldn’t help wondering how Raphael and Gardo, who never went to school, were able to write their sections.  I think I would have preferred keeping the story solidly in one perspective, or at least from the three boys’ points of views only.  (And I’d recommend either third person, or, if in first person, making Raphael and Gardo’s voices more distinct from each other.)  

 

Meagan: I wondered about the narration choices as I was reading, too.  The multiple narrators didn’t make it confusing to me, but I’m not sure how necessary it was.  For me, when I read a book with multiple narrators, I am looking for each new point of view to add something critical to the story.  I enjoy a viewpoint shift that gives me an “aha!” moment and allows me to see plot events or character in a new way that undeniably drives the story forward.  While some of the viewpoint shifts were interesting, I wouldn’t quite characterize them as critical.

 

Eva:  Overall I enjoyed the action and mystery, but I think there could have been more clues and foreshadowing.  For example, there is a climactic scene set in the graveyard on the eve of All Souls Day, and it is only then that we find out that in this culture people believe this is the time when “ghosts come up and walk around.”  I would have liked this information planted earlier in the story.  Instead it felt like the author saying, “oh, and by the way, what’s happening right now is a big deal because…”    

 

Meagan:  I was surprised at the lack of foreshadowing or lead up to the All Souls Day scene, too, but I really liked that scene for a whole separate reason.  Without spoiling it too much, what the boys end up doing (in a graveyard, at night, during a storm) would terrify most people.  Even imagining it is terrifying, but for the boys in the story, the horror-factor barely even registers.  This struck me as so noticeable, but then I realized what a strong comment this was on the condition of their lives.  The vague notion of spookiness about being in a graveyard at night is nothing in comparison to the real violence and risk that these boys are facing all the time in real life.  Imagined spookiness is much more of a threat if you are accustomed to a secure life, I think.  These boys have virtually no source of security (no family, no trustworthy government or protection from crime etc.).  So what do they have to fear from the idea of ghosts?

 

Eva:  As usual, it’s likely I’m being too hard on this book.  One of my students, a 7th grade girl, told me that she loved Trash and that it was pretty much her favorite book ever.  I think that says it all.

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THIS BOOK REMINDS US OF:

Eva:  In a way it reminded me of Holes by Louis Sachar.  In Holes it becomes clear that the boys at a juvenile detention center aren’t just digging to build character — they are trying to find something, although their Warden won’t say what or why.  Similarly, in Trash the police are looking for something that is obviously important, but they won’t say what or why.  Both are books of action and suspense, and both are about  disadvantaged boys who are mistreated by tyrannous and greedy authority figures.  The difference would be that both the setting and that story in Trash are a bit more serious than in Holes and bring up some more serious real-life issues.    

 

THIS BOOK IS A GREAT EXAMPLE OF:

  • Setting
  • Easy-to-access theme
  • Action and suspense
  • Social and environmental issues
  • It is an example of multiple first person narrators, but I wouldn’t say it’s a great example.  

 

FINAL TAKE-AWAYS:  

Eva:  A fast read with an intense setting that provides a great prompt for classroom discussions on social issues.  

Meagan:  I think I’ll remember this book for its empathy-enlarging social issues, but also as an example of literary theme with “training wheels.”  

Image result for trash andy mulligan

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamillo (Meagan & Eva’s Middle Grade Bookshelf)

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamillo (Meagan & Eva’s Middle Grade Bookshelf)

THE MIRACULOUS JOURNEY OF EDWARD TULANE, by Kate Dicamillo

Illustrations by Bagram Ibatoulline

Published by Candlewick Press in 2009

Boston Globe Horn Book Award for Fiction

suggested Age range:  7-10 years

 

SUMMARY:

Once, in a house on Egypt Street, there lived a china rabbit named Edward Tulane. The rabbit was very pleased with himself, and for good reason: he was owned by a girl named Abilene, who treated him with the utmost care and adored him completely.

And then, one day, he was lost.

Kate DiCamillo and Bagram Ibatoulline take us on an extraordinary journey, from the depths of the ocean to the net of a fisherman, from the top of a garbage heap to the fireside of a hoboes’ camp, from the bedside of an ailing child to the streets of Memphis. And along the way, we are shown a true miracle — that even a heart of the most breakable kind can learn to love, to lose, and to love again.

(from the official Edward Tulane website)

 

TOPICS AND THEMES:  Love and loss.  Includes the death of a child.  

edward-tulane

 

So what did we think?  

Meagan:  I am always impressed with Kate DiCamillo’s writing.  It is imperceptible.  She manages to write in a way that feels immersive and natural and lets me read the story without being aware of her writing.  Her use of language, pacing, tone etc. is borderline perfect.  

I read a feature article in Compose literary magazine a while back about the bad advice great writers give to beginning writers.  One of the examples of common bad advice was “In order to be a great writer you need to read a lot of great books.  From them, you’ll learn how to write.”  The writer went on to say that this is bad advice because one of the characteristics of a great book written by a very talented author is that you lose the sense that you’re reading a book someone wrote.  The story just is.  Great authors are great at hiding the machinery, in other words.  I think that is very true of Kate DiCamillo’s writing.  The machinery’s hidden from view pretty well.

 

Eva:  I one hundred percent agree.  Kate DiCamillo’s beautiful language and masterful storytelling make this book shine.  It begins with:

Once, in a house on Egypt Street, there lived a rabbit who was made almost entirely of china.  He had china arms and china legs, china paws and a china head, a china torso and a china nose….

You can hear the rhythm of the repeated words, and young children love both repeated words and poetic language.   

 

Meagan:  But despite the beautiful writing, I can’t say I really enjoyed this book much.  It was okay.  After talking a couple weeks ago about the super-active protagonist in The Graham Cracker Plot, it was such a departure to read a book with a completely inactive protagonist.  Edward literally cannot move or speak.  We hear his thoughts, and stuff happens to him and around him.  This is breaking a major writing “rule,” which the author gets away with because she’s fantastic and well-respected already.  I seriously doubt this would fly as anyone’s debut novel.  

 

Eva:  On the other hand, the story follows John Truby’s “rule” from The Anatomy of Story that a main character should begin with a weakness or moral flaw that he/she will overcome by the end of the story.  Of course, it’s not Edward’s actions that help him overcome his flaw because, like you said, he can’t act.  Still, it makes for a satisfying story because he starts with a flaw and changes for better by the end.  

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Illustrations in the book by Bigram Ibatoulline

 

Meagan:  Reading this felt like being told a very sweet bedtime story that begins with “Once upon a time there was a toy rabbit who didn’t know how to love.”  Once you read the beginning, you pretty much know it’s going to end up with, “And then he learned how to love.  The End.”  I can forgive it, because the story in the middle is pretty and well-written, but it’s not anywhere near compelling enough to make it onto a favorites list for me.   

 

Eva:   You’re right; this is a sweet, old-fashioned bedtime story with a predictable ending.  And I will even add that a lot of characters seemed like stock characters: the train-hopping hobo, the poor girl with consumption, etc.  BUT, I enjoyed the book overall.  It was beautifully written, and I think it makes a great read-aloud story for parents with kids ages, oh, 3 to 10.  In fact, I heard about this book because a woman I knew said she was reading it out loud to her five and eight year old.  This is the sort of book you could do that with.  It has a classic, story-telling tone and is accompanied by lovely illustrations.  In some ways it reminded me of The Velveteen Rabbit, which I will go into more in a bit.    

I will say one thing about the plot.  It is very simple and episodic.  In one chapter Edward is found by a new owner and experiences life with him/her.  Then, in the next chapter, he loses this new owner and is put in dire circumstances (thrown into the ocean, thrown into a dump, thrown off a train, etc.)  He is found by someone new and the cycle continues.  But again, the simple plot works because it’s DONE SO WELL.  It also works if you are reading the story out loud to younger children who don’t mind a simple plot.  

 

Meagan:  In my opinion, this is a book that adults are more likely to love than kids.  It’s very sentimental and tear-jerking regarding love and relationships and the transient nature of all that is most precious in life.  As a mom, I would definitely cry if I tried to read this to my son.  But, I think it’s the rare child who would embrace this book.  There certainly are some kids for whom a sweet story about love is going to be exactly their cup of tea, but it’s not for most kids.  As a teacher I would not read this to a class, or assign it, for that reason.

 

Eva:  In some ways I agree that this book is too sweet and sentimental and young for older elementary kids, but on the other hand, I remember LOVING The Velveteen Rabbit when I was a kid.  I remember rereading it even when I was in 5th and 6th grade — when I knew it was too young for me.  Now, do I think that The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane will become a classic like The Velveteen Rabbit?  No.  It’s a beautiful little story, but it’s not original enough, in my opinion, to be included in the cannon of classic children’s literature.  That honor can go to two of Dicamillo’s other books:  Because of Winn-Dixie and The Tale of Despereaux.     

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Eva & Meagan

 

THIS BOOK REMINDS US OF:

Eva:  As I said, I was reminded of The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams (first published in 1922).  They both have that classic, story-telling tone and a heartstring-plucking message.  The Velveteen Rabbit is a bit shorter than Edward Tulane, but for fun, let’s compare the opening lines of the two books:

THE MIRACULOUS JOURNEY OF EDWARD TULANE:  

Once, in a house on Egypt Street, there lived a rabbit who was made almost entirely of china.  He had china arms and china legs, china paws and a china head, a china torso and a china nose….

His ears were made of real rabbit fur, and beneath the fur, there were strong, bendable wires, which allowed the ears to be arranged into poses that reflected the rabbit’s mood – jaunty, tired, full of ennui.   

 

THE VELVETEEN RABBIT:  

There was once a velveteen rabbit, and in the beginning he was really splendid. He was fat and bunchy, as a rabbit should be; his coat was spotted brown and white, he had real thread whiskers, and his ears were lined with pink sateen. On Christmas morning, when he sat wedged in the top of the Boy’s stocking, with a sprig of holly between his paws, the effect was charming.

 

Rather similar, don’t you think?  As I was reading Edward Tulane, I couldn’t help thinking, “couldn’t she have picked something other than a toy rabbit?  A toy rabbit has already been done!!”   

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THIS BOOK IS A GREAT EXAMPLE OF:

  • Classic, story-telling tone
  • Rhythmic, poetic, beautiful language
  • Simple, episodic plot
  • Read-aloud story for younger middle-grade
  • Inanimate object as main character
  • A main character who overcomes a weakness/flaw

 

FINAL TAKE-AWAYS:  

Eva:  A beautifully-written, read-aloud story, but not Dicamillo’s most original;  it will never replace The Velveteen Rabbit as the classic children’s book about a toy rabbit.   

Meagan:  I am tempted to say this is the kind of book you get to write once you’re already an established author.  But on the other hand, I do believe you should write what’s in your heart and not worry too much about what you can or can’t sell as a debut.  You never know.  So, if this kind of story is what’s in your heart, go for it.  If it speaks to you, it will speak to someone else, too.

 

Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead on Eva & Meagan’s Middle-Grade Bookshelf

Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead  on Eva & Meagan’s Middle-Grade Bookshelf

This post is the first of my new monthly feature, Meagan & Eva’s Middle Grade Bookshelf.  To learn more about this feature — what it is and why we’re doing it — read here.

Meagan & Eva’s Middle-Grade Bookshelf Presents…

GOODBYE STRANGER, by Rebecca Stead

Published by Wendy Lamb Books, August 2015

A NYT Editors’ Choice and NYT Notable Children’s Books of 2015

suggested age range:  10 and up

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SUMMARY:

When Bridge was a kid she got hit by a car.  She spent a long time in the hospital and she nearly died.  Now she’s in middle school and wondering whether she’s alive for a reason — whether anyone is alive for a reason — or if life is just one big accident.  At least she’s still part of a “set” with her best friends:  Em (with her “curvy new curves”) and Tab (who is “kind of a know-it-all”).  In seventh grade, Bridge and her friends face big decisions, big mistakes, first crushes, and new identities.  And the strange new teens they are in the process of becoming must say goodbye to the no-longer-familiar kids they once were.

IMPORTANT TOPICS AND THEMES:  Goodbye Stranger touches lightly on the topic of sexting, but it’s in a middle-school appropriate way.  The book also deals with friendship, divorce of grandparents, first crushes, and growing up.  

 

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Eva & Meagan

So, what did we think?  

Meagan:  Overall, I loved this book.  The author has painted a painfully true picture of what it’s like to be in middle school.  The concrete details and well as the emotional details all feel super-realistic.

 

Eva:  I totally agree.  The book worked so well because it was true-to life:  specific yet universal.  The characters were fully-formed (and quirky).  The dialogue was spot-on for middle school.  The book was definitely character-driven, but even though it wasn’t a race-to-the-climax plot, I was never bored.  And speaking of character, I LOVE that Bridge decides her “thing” is going to be wearing cat ears every day:   

The cat ears were black, on a black headband.  Not exactly the color of her hair, but close.  Checking her reflection in the back of her cereal spoon, she thought they looked surprisingly natural.

I was so impressed at how Stead kept me engaged without a traditional plot.  And yet, there WAS some tension-building in the main plot as well as a triumphant and satisfying ending that I don’t always find in character-driven novels.

 

Meagan:  Right, it’s not what anyone would call a plot-driven, but the everything-is-high-stakes setting of middle school helps this work and still feel about as engaging as a more plot-driven story.  To me it sometimes seems pretty daunting to think about writing “literary” (vs. plot-driven) work for kids, but Rebecca Stead has clearly figured out how to do it.  I read another of her books, When You Reach Me, a while back.  It was great (and a Newberry winner). This is possibly even better, in my opinion.

 

Eva:  Yes, I remember reading When You Reach Me and enjoying it, but I might say Goodbye Stranger is more memorable, if not better.  Overall, I was very impressed.  The only thing I DIDN’T love about the book were the short sections that were written in second person.  For example:    

You paint your toenails.  You don’t steal nail polish, though.  Vinny calls you chicken:  all of her polish comes from the six-dollar manicure place…

The reader doesn’t find out until the end who these sections are about, and I have to say I found the mystery a bit confusing and unnecessary.

 

Meagan:   I actually liked those sections.  I thought they created a fun mystery for the reader to puzzle over, simply by withholding information (the identify of one of the narrators), but giving you enough detail that you could eventually figure it out.

 

Eva:  It was a gutsy move on Stead’s part to use second person, and I wonder about her decision to include this certain character’s story.  The sections DID add a layer of mystery, but I didn’t think the mystery was needed because there were so many other interesting storylines.  

Come to think of it, there were a lot of B plots in this novel, and I wonder about Stead’s decision to include them all — they certainly weren’t all necessary to the larger story.  And yet, they totally worked (except for the second person one, in my opinion).  It’s interesting to me how she so deftly crafted the novel with so many storylines.

 

Meagan:  What did you think of the title?  I normally don’t think much about titles, but this one stood out to me.  I think for a young readership, it does a good job of pointing to the book’s deep theme, without coming right out and saying what the theme is.  The transition from child to teenager is so huge that “goodbye” is not a bad way of describing it, and “stranger” is just about right for describing the person you are/were on the other side of the teen/child divide.

 

Eva:  I’m kind of dumb sometimes, so it took me a while to figure out how the title related to the book.  But once I got it, I loved it.  I remember being a kid and thinking how weird it was that I was going to become an adult who would essentially be a stranger to my kid self.  I’m not sure that middle school kids would get all the themes on their own, but this would be a great book to discuss with a group of kids.

 

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The Middle Grade Bookshelf

 

THIS BOOK REMINDS US OF:

A Judy Blume book because it goes through the realistic, day-to-day life of specific characters and touches on a hot button issue.    

In this case, the hot button issue is sexting.  It’s addressed in a serious, yet middle-school appropriate way (not too graphic). Still, I probably wouldn’t recommend this book under sixth grade unless the reader’s parent is ready to talk about this topic and feels their child is ready as well.  

 

THIS BOOK IS A GREAT EXAMPLE OF:

  • Realistic contemporary middle-grade
  • Close 3rd person voice
  • Use of second person voice
  • Fully-formed characters
  • Character-driven plot
  • Weaving of main plot with several B plots
  • A difficult topic handled in an age-appropriate way (sexting)

 

FINAL TAKE-AWAYS:  

Eva:  John Hodgeman once said “specificity is the soul of narrative.”  This is a specific story about very specific characters, and yet it feels universal and totally relatable.  I really enjoyed it.

Meagan:  As a writer, I could imagine coming back to this book for a closer read if I decided to tackle a contemporary, realistic fiction project (especially if I hoped for it to be more on the “literary” side).  Stead has done that so well here, I think there’s a lot I could learn from as a writer if I were to reread this and study the way she develops her characters and plot events.

 

Day 249: Pretty Pretty Princess Trivia ANSWERS

Day 249:  Pretty Pretty Princess Trivia ANSWERS

TODAY’S STATS:

# of pages written: 5

# of literary mags submitted to: 2

 

Yesterday I made up some trivia questions for my own amusement (and yours, too!)  Here are the answers.

Pretty Pretty Princess Trivia: Children’s Books That Were Made Into Movies:  ANSWERS!

#1 In the movie The Wizard of Oz, the magical shoes Dorothy takes from the Wicked Witch are ruby. What color are they in the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum?
silver

#2 What is the name (first and last) of the character played by Margaret Hamilton who is a mean woman in Kansas (who later becomes the Wicked Witch of the West) in the movie The Wizard of Oz?
Elmira Gulch

#3 Name two of Jess’s four sisters in the book Bridge to Terabithia.
Their names are May Belle, Joyce, Brenda, and Ellie

#4 Who plays Jess’s music teacher in the movie version of Bridge to Terabithia?
Zooey Deschanel

#5 What is Zero’s real name in the book Holes by Louis Sachar?
Hector Zeroni

#6 What is the one noticeable physical difference between the character Stanley Yelnats in the book Holes and Shia LeBouf, who plays Stanely in the movie version?
In the book Stanley is overweight (The movie’s pretty good otherwise.)

#7 Name 3 physical characteristics of “real witches” according to the book The Witches by Roald Dahl.
Real witches are bald with purple eyes and they have no toes. They also have large nostrils and think that children smell like dogs’ droppings.

#8 Which famous actress plays The Grand High Witch in the 1990 movie version of Roald Dahl’s The Witches?
Angelica Houston

#9 What candy does the White Witch give to Edmund in the book The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe?
Turkish delight (yum!)

#10 James McAvoy, who played Mr. Tumnus in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, starred in two different Oscar-winning movies. What were they?
Atonement and The Last King of Scotland

#11 The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman is the first book in the His Dark Materials trilogy. Name the two other books.
The Subtle Knife and The Amber Spyglass

#12 Name the famous actor and actress who play Lyra’s parents in the movie version of The Golden Compass.
Daniel Craig and Nicole Kidman (terrible casting choice – two blue-eyed parents can’t make a brown-eyed baby!)

#13 In what year was the final Harry Potter book (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows) released?
2007
#14 In what year was the final Harry Potter movie (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2) released?
2011

Angelica Houston as The Grand High Witch in The Witches.

Angelica Houston as The Grand High Witch in The Witches.

 

How’d you score?

 

Day 248: Pretty Pretty Princess Trivia: Children’s Books That Were Made Into Movies

Day 248:  Pretty Pretty Princess Trivia:  Children’s Books That Were Made Into Movies

TODAY’S STATS:

# of pages written:  7

On Monday night my boyfriend and I went to trivia at Wonderland Ballroom in Washington, DC. Our team name was Pretty Pretty Princess Special, and I think we came in last place.

You see, the situation at Wonderland is that every trivia night has a different host, so you never really know what you’re going to get. What we got Monday night was a host obsessed with college basketball. This was not good news for Pretty Pretty Princess Special, whose areas of expertise include math, children’s literature, physics, and the lyrics to Less Than Jake songs. None of those, by the way, were round categories. Instead we had a round about March Madness and another round dedicated to “the Big Ten.”

“What’s the Big Ten?” I whispered to Paul.

“I’m not sure,” he said. “I think they’re schools in the mid-west.”

“Excuse me,” I shouted out to the host, who stood on stage in a basketball jersey and baseball cap. “What’s the Big Ten?”

He stared at me like I had just asked him to explain where babies come from. “Uhhh, they’re eleven schools that are in the Big Ten Conference.”

“Is that for basketball?”

He said yeah, but he might as well have said duh and started slapping his hand against his chest like we used to do in the 90’s.

“So they’re schools that are good at basketball?” I clarified.

Now other people in the bar were starting to stare at me.

“They’re in the mid-west,” he said, looking uncomfortable. “State schools.”

The crowd began to murmur about whether or not I was going to shut up and let him read the first question, and when I looked at Paul, he was burying his face in his hand.

I turned to the rest of the bar and shouted, “there are no stupid questions!”

Only stupid trivia questions, I thought.

Paul and I proceeded to answer “Ohio” for every single question in the Big Ten round. We figured we’d be guaranteed one point that way. We then daydreamed about what our categories would be if we were to host Wonderland trivia night.

Naturally, one of the rounds would be about children’s literature. And so, as a way to make myself feel better after our crushing defeat Monday night, I have created this set of questions about children’s books that have been made into movies. Half of the questions are about the books, the other half about the movies. See what you know, without cheating, and I’ll post the answers next time.

Pretty Pretty Princess Special will rise again!

Pretty Pretty Princess Special will rise again!

Pretty Pretty Princess Trivia: Children’s Books That Were Made Into Movies

#1 In the movie The Wizard of Oz, the magical shoes Dorothy takes from the Wicked Witch are ruby. What color are they in the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum?

#2 What is the name (first and last) of the character played by Margaret Hamilton who is a mean woman in Kansas (who later becomes the Wicked Witch of the West) in the movie The Wizard of Oz?

#3 Name two of Jess’s four sisters in the book Bridge to Terabithia.

#4 Who plays Jess’s music teacher in the movie version of Bridge to Terabithia?

#5 What is Zero’s real name in the book Holes by Louis Sachar?

#6 What is the most noticeable physical difference between the character Stanley Yelnats in the book Holes and Shia LeBouf, who plays Stanely in the movie version?

#7 Name 3 physical characteristics of “real witches” according to the book The Witches by Roald Dahl.

#8 Which famous actress plays The Grand High Witch in the 1990 movie version of The Witches?

#9 What candy does the White Witch give to Edmund in the book The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe?

#10 James McAvoy, who played Mr. Tumnus in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, starred in two different Oscar-winning movies. What were they?

#11 The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman is the first book in the His Dark Materials trilogy. Name the two other books.

#12 Name the famous actor and actress who play Lyra’s parents in the movie version of The Golden Compass.

#13 In what year was the final Harry Potter book (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows) released?

#14 In what year was the final Harry Potter movie (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2) released?