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My 3-Step Plan for a Total Blog Makeover

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My 3-Step Plan for a Total Blog Makeover

Last week I announced that it was high time I gave my blog a makeover.

This week, I took the plunge and purchased this blogging course* on how to start a professional (and potentially money-making) blog. It was recommended to me by my friend Jeni over at The Coquette Kitchen.  Jeni knows everything about everything, and is in fact attending a blogging conference in Orlando right now. And so far she was right — I’m learning a lot from the course.

(*If you purchase Blog By Number using this affiliate link, I will get a commission, but it will cost you nothing extra. See? I’m learning about this money-making stuff already!)

Last week I was skeptical about the whole blogging-for-money thing. And I still am. I still feel that writing novels (and eventually, hopefully, making money from them) is more important to me than creating a blogging business. But I figure it can’t hurt to make my site more professional and get more readers.  And I’m getting excited about the changes I plan to make to my site.

Don’t worry — I’m not going to start writing nothing but inane listicles or posts about my favorite products. (I don’t really have any favorite products, except maybe Trader Joe’s vanilla almond milk, which my husband and I think is, hands-down, the best almond milk on the market.**)

(**I am not getting any money from Trader Joe’s. I just really like their almond milk.)

The point is, I don’t want to sell out. I’m going to keep writing what I want to write, in the way that I want to write it, but I’m going to try to reach more readers and keep an open mind about potential money-making opportunities.

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See?  Look!  I’m learning how to add text to images! Next I will learn how to market my images on Pinterest!

 

I now have a three-step plan, and it goes like this:

    1. Update my blog.  Move it from wordpress.com to wordpress.org.   Give it a fresh and professional look.  
    2. Market my blog and learn how to increase traffic to my site.  Build up an email list.
    3. Investigate possible ways to make money blogging.

 

Much to my husband’s consternation, Step 3 might be quite a ways down the road and involve a few more purchases.  And I don’t think I’ll ever be one of those career bloggers who makes a six-figure income.  But it couldn’t hurt to figure out how to get more readers and make a bit of money from something I’m going to be doing anyway.

I’ve got a lot to learn.  And, to be honest, I’m feeling a bit overwhelmed.  I’m not sure how long the blog makeover is going to take me.  I’m hoping to have the new site up and running by the end of the summer, but in order to do that, I may have to let this be my last post for a while. Wish me luck! I’ll post again in a few weeks and let you know how it’s going.

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Getting hair extensions is a type of makeover I do NOT recommend.  I tried it a few years ago.  Terrible.  Might have to blog about THAT experience sometime.

 

 

 

 

 

Updating My Look & Blogging for Money

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Updating My Look & Blogging for Money

The other day I was looking through photos from the past couple years, and I realized I was wearing the same dress in almost every picture. No joke, take a look:

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Cape Cod, 2012

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Mexico, 2013

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Seattle, 2014

 

I still love this dress, and it would probably be on my body right now if it wasn’t stretched out and threadbare from my wearing it approximately twice a week for the past five years.

Besides my wardrobe, you know what else has been looking the same for the past five years? This blog. Come July, In The Garden of Eva will turn five years old.

A lot has changed since I started this blog. Back then I was single, living in my friend’s guest room on Cape Cod, and just learning how to write novels.

Now I’m married with a baby, living in Maryland, with a couple of finished novels sitting on my desktop. But this blog still looks the same.

Is it time for a change?

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Vancouver. This dress. Again.

 

On the wardrobe front, I decided yes, I need some new looks, especially some nursing-friendly (but not too mom-ish) tops and dresses.

After a few disappointing trips to the mall, I decided to try Stitch Fix*. I’m sure by now you’ve heard of this service, as every blogger in the world has at least one post dedicated to what their Stitch Fix “personal stylist” sent them. So I won’t go into detail. I’ll just say that I kept one dress from my first box, one skirt from my second, and sent everything back with my third. I will also say that Stitch Fix customer service was super nice, and because I was so unhappy with my third box, they are sending me a fourth one for free. Woohoo!

(*If you decide to try Stitch Fix and use my referral link, I will get a $25 credit, but it will cost nothing extra for you. Come on, help Mama buy a new dress!)

So I’m slowly updating my look. And now the question is, should update the look of this blog?

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My mom and me at my brother’s wedding over the weekend.  I am wearing a dress from Stitch Fix.

 

My friend Jeni Wallace, who is also a new mom, recently started a beautiful food blog, The Coquette Kitchen, and she is currently learning how to make money blogging. She strongly encouraged me to think about how I could, too.

I have to admit, it’s an intriguing thought. I live in the DC area, which is ranked the most expensive place in the country for childcare. Not to mention the absurd commute times. (It often takes me 45 minutes to drive 6.5 miles to the school where I work part-time.) So the more I can work from home while my baby is napping, the better.

And besides, wouldn’t it be nice to make money doing something I enjoy… and something that I’m going to do anyway?

But the more I talked to Jeni, the more I realized that in order to make money blogging, I would have to totally change my approach.

And I’m not just talking ads or affiliate links, although those are ways to make money. According to Jeni, the number one way bloggers make money is by selling their own e-books and online courses. Some of these courses sell for as much as $40 or $50 or even $100 or $1000! As I began poking around at some of the money-making blogs out there, I realized that many offer courses on how to make money blogging.

Wait a minute… So the best way to make money blogging is to sell courses on how to make money blogging? Hmm…

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Jeni Wallace and me.

 

Not all courses are on how to blog, of course. Jeni’s husband, Daniel David Wallace, is also making a foray into the blogging business; he has a free e-book on how to write better sentences, as well as a course called “Unlock the Six-Step Story.” Right now they are both free, but I assume he’ll start charging for courses once he builds up his fan base.

Daniel’s courses make sense to me. He has a PhD in creative writing and is a successful and innovative writing instructor. He’s legitimately an expert who has unique and helpful information to share. His content is original and genuine and worth paying for.

I also have no doubt if Jeni starts offering courses, hers will be amazing as well. Not only is Jeni a fabulous cook, she basically knows everything about everything. She’s an expert at researching things and breaking them down in a friendly and helpful manner so that the average research-hating-lazy-person like me can digest them. Jeni could offer a course in anything from “how to plan a European culinary vacation with a baby in tow” to “how to always order the best thing at a restaurant both at home and abroad,” and it would be well worth the money.

So that’s great. Jeni and Daniel are going to become a blogging-business power couple. Good for them.

But what about me? What about my blog?

Is there a way that I could make a bit of money by blogging that feels genuine? Do I have unique information to offer that people would be willing to pay for? How can I get more followers? Do I need to change my blog to look more polished and professional? Do I need to change the way I write my posts? And if I change the way I blog, will it still be fun?

I don’t know.

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GET A NEW DRESS, EVA!!

 

It might be worth doing a little research at least. Maybe even forking out the money for this course on how to make money blogging**. (Jeni recommends it, and if Jeni recommends it, I know it must be good.)

(**If you purchase Blog By Number using this affiliate link, I will get a commission, but it will cost you nothing extra. See? I’m learning about this money-making stuff already!)

But there’s this part of me that wonders, do I really want to spend my time researching how to make money blogging and writing e-courses? I don’t have much free time as it is. Wouldn’t I rather spend it working on my fiction in the hopes that one day I might make a bit of money from my published novels? That’s the type of writing I really want to be doing anyway.

But if I’m not making money from this blog, and not very many people read it, what’s the point of writing it in the first place?

Because I like it? Is that enough of a reason?

No matter what I decide, though, I do think it’s time for a blog makeover.

I’m considering upgrading my hosting site and freshening up the look of my blog. Maybe I’ll start looking into that and wait until Jeni’s figured out this blogging for money thing… then I’ll buy her course. ‘Cuz I know if she made one, it’d be good.

Hey, if I can have a Stitch Fix personal stylist pick out my clothes for me, I can have Jeni do my research for me. And in the end, both my wardrobe and my blog will have a fresh look for the world!

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Me, my husband, and our baby. I’m wearing a new skirt from Stitch Fix.

 

 

Driving & Writing, or, Mama’s Here to Stay

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Driving & Writing, or, Mama’s Here to Stay

My husband and I have decided to stay in our apartment for another year. For a while we toyed with the idea of renting a house. But just the thought of moving with a four-month-old baby was so exhausting, we decided to stay put.

Next spring we’ll think about buying a house – I’d definitely like more space and a yard – but we plan to stay in Silver Spring, Maryland. We like it here. We can metro into downtown DC in less than 20 minutes, we’re within walking distance to Rock Creek Park, and though downtown Silver Spring isn’t as cool as DC neighborhoods, there’s a bubble tea place, an indie movie theater, several yoga studios and a T.J. Maxx, so I’m happy with that.

Depending on where we buy a house, I may or may not be able to continue tutoring part-time at Washington International School in Northwest DC. Right now it takes me about 20 minutes to drive the 6.4 miles there, and then, because of rush hour, it takes anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour to drive back home. I can deal with this ridiculousness because of podcasts, but if we move any further north or east, the commute won’t be worth it.

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I’m also going to have to consider buying a bigger car at some point.  My little yellow two-door isn’t quite made for mommy life.

 

What’s ironic is that back in 2010, I used to live in DC and commute up to Silver Spring to teach. Back then I didn’t want to live in Silver Spring because I thought it was a lame suburb and all the cool kids lived in DC. My, how the times have changed.

Back then I didn’t have a car, and so I often got driven around by other teachers for off-campus events or after-work happy hours. I was also the volleyball coach my second year there, so I spent a lot of time in the front of the school bus as we fought afternoon traffic to get the girls to various schools for their games.

These days, as I’m driving around suburban Maryland, I’ll sometimes have flashbacks to sitting in that school bus, watching the same scenery flash by. Except back then I never knew where I was. I didn’t know the difference between Bethesda and Chevy Chase. I didn’t know that Wisconsin Avenue turned into Rockville Pike north of the beltway, or that you could take Connecticut all the way from Northwest DC into northern Silver Spring.

When someone else is driving, you don’t pay attention to details like street names or exit numbers. When you have to drive yourself, on the other hand, you not only pay attention to where you’re going, you also start to figure out how the roads connect. Even if you rely heavily on your GPS, after a while you begin to form a map in your mind.

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Sometimes we let the baby drive.

 

It occurred to me the other day that the difference between driving and being driven is much like the difference between writing a book and reading one. When you’re reading, you get to sit back and enjoy the ride. But when you’re writing, you have a mental map, and you have to figure out how the story roads connect. Even if you take the scenic route, you need to get your readers from the starting point to the destination… and that’s not always easy. In fact, it can be as frustrating as DC rush hour traffic.

Speaking of which, the other day I was stuck in stop-and-go traffic on 495 and decided to take a different exit than my usual one. As I followed my GPS home, I suddenly realized how a road I was familiar with connected to another road I was familiar with, and my mental map of suburban Maryland grew a bit more sophisticated. It was, in it’s own little way, sort of exciting.

It was similar to the way I feel when I make a new connection in my writing.  It’s exciting when I suddenly realize a new direction to take, or a way I can bridge two ideas.

That’s the nice thing about both driving and writing: being in the driver’s seat with the radio (or a podcast) blaring, going my own way.

Watch out, Silver Spring: mama’s here to stay!

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Here I am wearing a Cut with Light DC flag necklace, but yeah… I live in Maryland.

Get Rolling, or, When You’ve Forgotten How to Write

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Get Rolling, or, When You’ve Forgotten How to Write

When my baby was nearly eleven weeks old, she started rolling from her tummy onto her back, and I was very impressed and proud. Recently, at three and a half months, she’s started rolling from her back onto her tummy. Again, I am impressed and proud.

What’s frustrating, though, is that now, when I lay her down on her play mat, she immediately rolls over and then starts to cry because she’s on her tummy and she doesn’t like it.

“Roll back over,” I tell her. “I know you know how. I’ve captured you doing it on video.”

But for some reason she can’t remember this previously-learned skill. And she’s upset about it.

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Baby on her tummy.  I know she doesn’t look upset, but believe me, she started crying 5 seconds after this picture was taken.

 

The other day I was doing some final polishes on my novel in preparation to start querying agents. As I was reading over the manuscript I began to wonder, how did I ever create this story in the first place?

I developed the idea for the novel a little over a year ago and wrote the first draft last spring, but I seem to have forgotten how I did it. Sometimes it feels like I’m revising someone else’s work.

Now that I’m finishing up this project, it’s time to start something new. Time to switch from revising to creating.  Time to start rolling the other way.

If I can only remember how.

 

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One way to get the baby to sleep.

 

Nap time with the baby has been a challenge these past few days. When I put her in her crib, half the time she immediately flips onto her tummy and then starts to cry. Yesterday I had to walk her around the neighborhood in her stroller for over and hour because that was the only way I could get her to take an afternoon nap.

Paul and I wonder if we should leave her on her tummy to struggle and cry. Maybe, if she gets frustrated enough, she’ll remember how to do it.

Or, maybe, we just have to be patient and give her time.

Normally, when I finish with one writing project, I rush to start something new; I’m in a panic not to waste time. But having a baby has made me a bit more relaxed. It’s a successful day if I manage to get dressed and go grocery shopping. So if a day goes by when I don’t work on writing, it’s not the end of the world.

Still, there is a part of me that worries — what if I’ve lost this previously-learned skill, this ability to create fiction?  I worry that this time I won’t be able to write another novel.

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Come on, baby!  Get rolling!

 

While walking the baby around the neighborhood the other day, an idea for a novel popped into my head. That’s how ideas usually arrive. You can’t force yourself to have one; they appear out of the blue, usually when you’re doing something unrelated to writing.

The idea has gotten me thinking, and I can feel the gears in my brain shifting from revision mode to creation mode. I haven’t forgotten how to write, I just haven’t done it in a while.

I’m not in a hurry, but I’m sure soon enough, I’ll get rolling on a new novel.

Writing About Apples, or, How to be Creative

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Writing About Apples, or, How to be Creative

Back in March, my mom texted me happy St. Patrick’s Day and asked, “so what percentage Irish is the baby? Only a math major can figure it out!” I took this as a challenge, and after texting my mother-in-law for information, I did some calculations and came up with this:

Phoebe is approximately…

  • 1/4   Italian (25%)
  • 7/32   German (approx. 21.9%)
  • 3/16   Scottish/Irish (approx. 18.8%)
  • 5/32   English (approx. 15.6%)
  • 1/16   French (approx. 6.3%)
  • 1/16   Danish (approx. 6.3%)
  • 1/32   Polish (approx. 3.1%)
  • 1/32   Czech (approx. 3.1%)

 

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My baby is probably less than 15% Irish.  But still very kissable!

 

Now that the baby is three months old I’m slowly getting back to my paying jobs, one of which is writing math curriculum.

And last week I created an assignment called “Melting Pot Math” in which the students have to figure out the “fractional ethnicity” of a person based on the countries his great-grandparents are from.

My bosses are happy to have me back; they continually praise me for my ability to come up with creative math projects. And I’m sort of amazed myself. I’ve been doing this job for over four years now; you’d think I would have run out of ideas for teaching fractions and long division. And yet I always come up with something, often based on whatever is going on in my life: wedding planning, visiting Mexico, getting an ultrasound. I even wrote a math curriculum called “Literary Agent.”

I’m also getting back to my other part-time job – tutoring – but right now I’m only doing it on Skype. I just hired a high school girl who will come to the apartment one afternoon a week to watch Phoebe while I’m on Skype, but up until now my husband has been watching her while I tutor.

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On Sunday I was tutoring, and my student’s camera wasn’t working.  She could see me, but I couldn’t see her. It didn’t matter, though. She was just reading out loud to me from To Kill a Mockingbird, and we were discussing.

Out of the corner of my ear, I heard Phoebe start crying, and it sounded like a hungry cry, so I told my student to hold on a second. I fetched the baby and then said, “okay, keep reading. I’m just going to feed her.”

I guess I had a moment of flamingo syndrome –I couldn’t see my student, so I assumed she couldn’t see me. I pulled down my tank top and started breastfeeding. A few seconds later, I remembered that my student could see me, and I adjusted the camera so that only my face was visible on the screen. Oops! I can only hope she was so engrossed with To Kill a Mockingird that she didn’t notice her tutor flashing her!

Toward the end of the lesson, my student told me that she had to give a speech the next day to the entire middle school. “Our teacher told us we could pick any topic we wanted, so I chose apples,” she said.

“Apples? Like the fruit?” I asked.

“Yeah.”

She practiced her speech, and I gave her a few pointers.

“Why did you decide to write your speech about apples?” I then asked.

She grinned. “I didn’t know what to write about, and I was eating an apple, and my friend said ‘why don’t you write about apples.’” She shrugged. “So I did.”

I’m pretty sure that’s not what her teacher had in mind for the assignment. On the other hand, it’s a good lesson: when you don’t know what to write about, look around and write what you see. Write about your baby. Write about your day. Write about the apple you’re currently eating.

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When I started this blog four and a half years ago, I worried I might run out of things to write about. But, like with math curriculum, I always come up with something. Often I take inspiration from whatever is going on in my life, big or small.  Like accidentally Skype-flashing my student.

I don’t consider myself to be an amazingly creative person, pulling brilliant ideas out of thin air. Often I’m just a girl writing about apples. I look around, shrug, and write about whatever is in front of my face.

 

 

 

How I Chose My MFA Program, or, Doing Your Research

How I Chose My MFA Program, or, Doing Your Research

It’s a funny story how I decided to get my MFA in Fiction Writing.  Spoiler alert:  it does not involve research.

I was twenty-four years old and in my second year as a full-time math teacher when I stopped by a little bookstore near my house in Uptown New Orleans and my eyes fell on a paperback called Pretty Little Dirty by Amanda Boyden.

I didn’t know Amanda Boyden then. I didn’t know that she lived in New Orleans and that one day I would sit with her and her husband at a bar in Spain, or that, a few years later, we would have margaritas together in Mexico. I didn’t know I would go to parties, and even a wedding, at her house in Mid-City New Orleans. All I saw was the skinny girl on the cover of the book, her arm cocked like she might be holding a cigarette, her face scribbled out with fluorescent yellow highlighter, and I knew it was just the sort of thing I liked to read: a literary coming-of-age story.

So I bought the book and devoured it. Then I read the author bio and learned that Amanda Boyden taught a class on fiction writing at the University of New Orleans.

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It was around this time that I started thinking to myself, gosh, do I really want to be a math teacher for the rest of my life? The answer was no. What I really wanted to do was write novels, but I’d always assumed that was something people did in their spare time – it wasn’t  a viable career option. (And, to be honest, I still think that’s somewhat accurate… at least for a lot of people.)

The problem was, teaching left me emotionally, physically, and mentally drained. It was difficult to find the energy to write in the little spare time I had. So I made a bold move: I quit my teaching job and embarked on a series of random jobs (barista, receptionist, orthodontic assistant) that gave me more time and energy for writing.

That summer, I sat down to write what I hoped to be a literary coming-of-age novel. When I finished the last sentence, I was elated. A day later, I reread the whole thing and was completely dismayed. The book wasn’t good – I knew it wasn’t good – but I had no idea how to make it better.

That’s when I decided to contact Amanda Boyden.

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Author Amanda Boyden

 

I’ve since looked to see if I could find the original email I sent to Amanda, along with her reply. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately), I can’t, but I know I said I’d enjoyed her book, and then I explained that it was the sort of thing I hoped to write, but I was having trouble figuring out how exactly to write a novel in the first place. I was thinking maybe she and I could get together for coffee sometime to talk about writing.

Yes, I realize now how naïve that sounds. So I don’t blame Amanda for how she responded. I don’t remember her exact words, but it was something along the lines of, no, I don’t have time to meet with you, but maybe you should check out the MFA program at The University of New Orleans.

And here’s where I’ll admit that up until then, I didn’t know there was even such a thing as a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing. (It does sound rather absurd, right?  A Masters degree in creative writing?!)  I realize that might make twenty-five-year-old Eva sound a bit dumb, but, to be honest,twenty-five-year-old Eva was a bit dumb.

Twenty-five-year-old Eva was also excited. Going to school was something I’d always exceled at. No wonder I was having trouble writing a good novel: I needed to go back to school and learn how to do it properly!

So I went online and found information about the University of New Orleans “low residency” program, which sounded cool. In the program, students took classes online during the school year and then did intensive summer abroad sessions. That sounded good to me. Online classes meant I could keep my day job at the orthodontist’s office, and I hadn’t studied abroad as an undergraduate, so this would be my chance to do some traveling.

I’m embarrassed to say that I did no other research. None.  I didn’t look to see if there were other MFA programs that were more highly rated, or that perhaps focused specifically on novel-writing. I didn’t look into ways to get my tuition paid for. I didn’t even realize that there was also an in-person MFA program at the University of New Orleans I could have applied to.

I’ve never been a fan of research, and I’ve always been a bit trigger-happy when I’m excited about something. At the time, I honestly didn’t think that anyone would pay for my MFA. I didn’t realize that many schools offer teaching assistantships – something that would have been smart for me to do because not only would my tuition have been covered, but I would have gotten experience teaching at the college level.

Instead, without researching any other programs, I applied for the low-residency MFA at the University of New Orleans, and I was accepted. The following summer, I headed to Madrid, and my Fiction Workshop professors were Amanda Boyden and her husband, Joseph.

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My first year in the MFA program, Amanda Boyden gave a reading while doing THIS.

 

It’s hard to say whether or not I regret making such a quick decision. Yes, I did have to take out a student loan to pay for my degree, but I paid if off pretty quickly. And it’s true I could have gotten a teaching assistantship that led to a college teaching job, but I don’t want to be a teacher (remember?) And I probably could have gone to a more “prestigious” school, but to be honest, I’m not sure I would have liked that any better.

Besides, so many good things have come out of my MFA from UNO. I met some wonderful (and eccentric!) people, and I had some amazing travel experiences. If not for my MFA from UNO, I never would have become involved with Burlesque Press or gotten to spend a month in Mexico on a writing fellowship.

In this case, my utter lack of research didn’t seem to hurt me. In other words, I got lucky.

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Here I am in Madrid with fellow writer Jeni Stewart(now Jennifer Wallace), who has become a very dear friend and resource.

 

I’m thinking about all of this as I prepare to query agents with the novel I recently finished revising. In the past I’ve been trigger-happy about contacting agents, and I’ve learned my lesson. This is one case where I am definitely doing my research. I am spending time on Twitter and agency websites and Manuscript Wishlist. I’m reading agent blogs and interviews. I’m making a spreadsheet of possible agents and revising my query letter over and over again. I know that when it comes to querying agents, it pays to do your homework.

My MFA didn’t teach me anything about querying agents. That’s something I learned on my own after a lot of practice, and probably in part because I did it wrong the first time around.

And, in a way, that’s how I’ve learned to write as well.

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Here I am in Madrid for the running of the bulls.  There’s a story in this picture.  There definitely is.

Has Becoming a Parent Made the Muses Flee?

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Has Becoming a Parent Made the Muses Flee?

Having a baby means I’ve started making up songs about everything. At changing time I sing a song to the tune of “Let’s All Go to the Lobby” that goes,, “Let’s go check your diaper, let’s go check your diaper, let’s go check your diiii-aper….. and see if there’s some poop.”

I sing a song when she’s cranky that goes “it’s time for wrap time nap time, nap time in the wrap. It’s wrap time nap time, when you feel like crap.” I also sing about her current favorite page of her current favorite Dr. Suess book, Circus McGirkus. The page depicts a creature called the “drum-tummied Snumm” so I sing to the tune of “Chim Chim Cher-ee” something like this: “drum-tummy-tum, drum-tummy-tum, drum-tum-ta-roo.  You love drum-tummied Snumm, and he loves you.” That song has a lot of ever-changing verses and usually includes me playing the drums (gently) on my baby’s belly.

 

My husband and my favorite song (or at least the one that gets stuck in our heads the most) is the song I made up for “tummy time.” It goes, predictably, “tummy time, tummy time, tummy time for baby. Tummy time! Tummy time! Tummy time. Tummy time! Tummy time!”

My brother and his fiancé visited over the weekend, and I’m pretty sure the tummy time song got stuck in their heads, too, especially because we were singing about everything to the tune of it: “Picture time, picture time, pictures with Uncle Deven. Look so cute! Look so cute! Look so cute. Look so cute! Look so cute!”   You get the idea.

I’m sorry to say that my husband and I proved to be like every other set of annoying new parents in that we found it hard to talk to Deven and Lauren about anything other than baby stuff. Oh sure, we asked them about their wedding plans, and we had a few non-baby-related conversations. But we also insisted on showing them our stroller and describing the baby’s sleep habits. We talked to them ad nauseum about the baby’s bodily functions. (Literally ad nauseum…when we described using the Nose Frida snot-sucker during breakfast, Lauren started gagging.)

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With the Nose Frida you can suck your child’s snot out of their nose using the power of your own mouth.  I’m kind of obsessed with it.

 

I’ve been worried about this. I love my baby, but I don’t want to be one of those people who only talks about her kid. That’s why I’ve given myself a goal: at least once a week I will leave the baby at home with Daddy and have myself some adult time. I’ve been successful at this for the past three weeks. The first two times I went out for drinks with friends, and last week I went to my first real yoga class since giving birth.

I’m also slowly finding time between the feedings and the diaper changes to work on writing. I sent in an application for a Work in Progress grant from SCBWI, and I’ve been revising my current manuscript. But one thing I haven’t done in a long time is write any new fiction. I feel I don’t have the time, energy, or brainpower for that.  But I also wonder if, as time goes on and I have more time and energy, I’m going to continue to use the baby as an excuse for why I’m not writing anything new.

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The drum-tummied Snumm of Dr. Suess’s Circus McGirkus.

 

There’s this fear that creeps in on me sometimes, that I am losing my ability to be creative. When I look back at stories I wrote in my early twenties, I’m somewhat in awe.  Not of the story structure or writing itself, but of the uninhibited creativity of my ideas. How did I come up with that? Was I more creative back then? I know I’m a better writer now, but I worry that my ideas and inspirations are not as free-flowing.  I worry that the realities and responsibilities of being an adult, and now a parent, have sent the creative muses looking for someone else — someone with more time and energy and brainpower.

That’s why these stupid little songs I’ve been singing are, in a way, comforting. Coming up with silly rhymes and funny phrases isn’t the same as composing a poem or writing a fictional scene, but it’s still being creative with words, isn’t it?

And maybe, as the baby starts to nap more regularly and I have a little time to myself, the muses will hear me singing “Tummy Time” and decide to pay me a visit.

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Baby meets her Uncle Deven!